Membership based instruction oriented visual arts organization

Definitive Designs in Beadwork – A Unique Perspective by Individual Artists

Definitive Designs in Beadwork – A Unique Perspective by Individual Artists

The ten artists involved in this Exhibition at the Ingersoll Creative Arts
Centre have called their Exhibition by this title as their works cover a diversity
of techniques. “4 Sirius Beaders” use high quality glass beads for designing art works,
creating jewellery, beading on fabric and good quality findings.
Beading is an art form that spans centuries and is enjoyed by cultures across the globe.
Instruction is given in various beading techniques and bead weaving stitches to promote
and educate this historic art form.

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emilyEmily Downey is an up and coming bead artist and jewelry maker, with an extensive background in clay and other art media. Transitioning from clay into bead work has given her an unique eye for design and function. Emily studied in large city centers in America, has taught adults art courses, and lived among and taught Haitians in Port Au Prince for several years. Her experiences give her an eye for quality folk inspired craft with a keen awareness of what appeals to urban communities. While working in clay she sold her work at Mudfire Gallery and started the Mugs For Jugs collaborative fundraiser for breast cancer research. Currently her work is showcased online in the Dezod Daughters Studio, she is one of the teachers with 4 Sirius Beaders, and sells custom jewelry through Etsy.

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deborahDeborah Downey is an award winning fibre artist. She is a writer, illustrator, and cartoonist, having been published in Kindred Spirit magazine, Early Canadian Life, The Salvation Army’’s War Cry, Our Canada magazine, More Of Our Canada, Haute Handbags, Anglican Churchman, and several books of poetry. Deborah was invited to design and create bulletin artworks for the Southern Territorial Headquarters of the Salvation Army in Atlanta Georgia. She has created multi-media art quilts and years later was the executive secretary for the Canadian Doll Artist Association.  Having achieved recognition in the Canadian doll/figural-artist world and in multi-media circles, she brings her sense of the unusual, thought provoking, and historical to her bead designs. Deborah combines fabrics, wood, metals, rusted “trash”, buttons, plastics and paper to the beaded artworks. Not often worn but more likely to be “Objets d’art”, Deborah’s creations send the viewer on an inner adventure.

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 helen

Barbara-Helen Hill is of Haudenosaunee /Iroquois and British Isles heritage born on Six Nations and currently living in Brantford. She embraces all of the generations that have handed down the gifts that she is grateful for. Barbara-Helen received her Master’’s Degree in American Studies from SUNY at Buffalo and is a story teller in both the fabric arts and the books/poetry that she writes.

Artist Statement I enjoy making art that tells a story. My first wall-hanging was Skywoman Falls into the Millennium and the doll I placed on that quilt was a tiny corn husk doll made by my aunt. From there the dolls have just been a part of my work –– helping me tell the stories. I enjoy making art that makes people laugh and makes them want to learn.

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BJpegarbara MacDonald is easily distracted by everything that sparkles. She is inspired by the multiple colours, shapes and textures of glass beads, semi-precious stones and crystals which she weaves together using a tiny needle and special thread. Many of the stitches she uses in her creations are rooted in the ancient bead weaving history of Europe, Africa and North America.

Her gorgeous ‘‘Dragon’’ bracelets with their fabulous metallic scaly sheen, each take 20 to

30 hours to create and are born with their own stories. Trained as a graphic artist, Barbara comes from a family of artists and craftspeople. Although she has many interests, off-loom bead weaving is her passion and her focus.

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marion jutziMarion Jutzi is an accomplished seamstress, needle-artist, designer, and bead weaver. Having a Bachelor’s degree in General Science and a college education in design, she is talented on various levels. Teaching grades 9 through 12 and Physical Education brought professional satisfaction until she founded her own company and a rewarding second career in custom made gymnastic, track, and swim wear. Always moving forward, Marion then turned her talents to hand embroidery. She discovered that beadwork and embroidery are natural companions and went on to win prizes in fibre arts. Bead weaving is a skill unto itself and Marion now designs amulet bags and other wearable bead-art. When asked about her diverse skills and experience, Marion says; “It’s a journey”.

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 mary copeMary Cope is an Ontario resident who taught Biology and Science at the High School level for twenty-two years.

For two decades, she extensively studied and taught weaving, spinning and dyeing.  In the last twenty years, she has been studying many techniques and applying them to her work. These include painting, printing, beading, machine and hand embroidery, photography and drawing.

Her work has been exhibited in many juried shows in Canada.

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marzieMarzie Hilliker:   I am one of the co-owners of 4 Sirius Beaders in Paris, Ontario. We started our business in 2000 and between us share the work duties as is required in running a bead store. No one person does it all and that makes it an enjoyable enterprise.  When I was introduced to bead weaving it was so entirely new to me that I jumped right in, eager to learn this new craft. In the past, I’ve spent many years with yarn, some paints, and clay. Some of my most enjoyable years have been at the Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre learning to work with clay, and learning the ins and outs of firings, of glazes, and taking classes with Jeff Lounsbury.  Beading will still be my passion but as it is with all things, I like variety and I find myself looking at interesting crochet patterns and trying them out.  There is never a dull moment.

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diane 2Diane Petrella.  “We’ve only just begun” was a statement I made on our web site for 4 Sirius Beaders … the ‘women in charge,’ if you look it up.  I began beading in 2000, and it has become a passion of mine since.  Sharing our expressions in colour and design has encouraged me to play.  I know my beading artistry is growing as I explore.  I’m finding out what I can accomplish in this atmosphere of support, and encouragement. As I said in the beginning, “We’ve only just begun.”

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terriTerri Morin.  At present, Terri lives in Italy. She continues to draw, paint, sculpt, and bead. Since she was little she has worked with multi mediums, depending on moods or inspirations. Always drawn to mother nature, animals, trees in particular, you will find these subjects in many of her works. Even though she lives in Italy, she Is proudly Canadian. She wishes all of her friends, fellow artists, at the bead show, “Definitive Designs in Beadwork”, a hardy congratulations, and wishes she could join us for this special day.

 

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Tiena Habing

          I was first introduced to beads many years ago when I took a class in bead embroidery and became enchanted with beads. They wiggled their way into bits and pieces of the work I was doing at that time. But after awhile my interest in using beads lessened. Years later when at loose ends Jpegfor something to do, I began making some basic little bracelets with beads from my mother. I was enamoured with beads, all the colours, the different finishes, sizes and shapes. My mind raced with possibilities and my fingers flew with needle and thread trying to keep up. That first weekend I made 15-20 of those bracelets.

          My mind had been opened to all the new possibilities working with beads could bring and after a few classes to learn some of the basic stitches, I happily began experimenting and creating with beads. I enjoy the process of making smaller elements and just seeing what happens when I fold, twist, turn or add on to that element. It’s always a delight to see the end result whatever it may be.

          Several of my pieces of work have been featured in the books Contemporary Geometric Beadwork vol I &II , by Kate McKinnon as well as in the blog for the book by the same name. The new techniques and ideas generated by this project have reshaped the direction my pieces have taken. It’s been a fabulous journey that I’m quite sure isn’t over yet.

          The rhythmic and repetitive nature of many beading stitches is calming and soothi+ng. There is something quite wonderful in the feel of the beads in my hands as I work. And all the gorgeous colours of beads that evoke so many images in my mind.  Perhaps it’s the colours of a recent sunset or farmers field I passed by, perhaps the colour of a jar of honey or a basket of fresh berries or the colour of the sea when at the beach but most often its because that combination of colours just makes me happy inside and that is the singular reason why I continue to bead — it makes me happy inside.

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Henrietta Habing‘s love with a needle and thread began in her childhood.  Growing up in the Netherlands part of the school curriculum was learning to knit and sew.   On Wednesday afternoons when there was no school she was allowed to travel  back and work to the nun who taught embroidery.  She told the story that at the age of 9 a neighbour brought over a tablecloth that needed hemstitching for my mother to do.  Her perseverance lasted throughout her lifetime.

henrietta

After many years of sewing, embroidering and knitting, it was an easy transition to learn beading.  On a visit to the Netherlands she came across patterns for small purses that were knit with beads.  She brought home some pattern books, found local sources for buying the beads but where to get the needles?  A longtime neighbour had a business working with wire and made some needles for her.  She was off and knitting. Beading kept her busy over the years when a variety of ailments limited her mobility.  When she broke her wrist, the doctor being aware of her beadwork, had the cast made so she could continue to bead with it on.  Henrietta then beaded an underwater scene with small fish and glued them to the cast so it was prettier to look at.

 

Henrietta loved peyote stitch and worked on many projects that took weeks to complete, often working 6-8 hours a day on her beading.  If there was a mistake in a piece she was known to cut it apart to fix the problem or in one instance cut out a piece and rework it to get rid of the mistake.  While other beaders were shocked that she took scissors to her work, she just shrugged and said if it all fell apart so be it.  She worked her magic with that piece and replaced the piece so that unless you knew where to look you’d never see where the work was done.

 

For Henrietta beadwork provided both a challenge for the hands and the mind while at the same time being soothing and relaxing.  She freely shared her knowledge and work with many others, often making a bracelet or bookmark as a thank you gift.  The pieces on display here are but a portion of her work.